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Antonine Wall

Antonine Wall

Antonine Wall

Antonine Wall — the Antonine Wall was constructed in the AD 140s on the orders of the Emperor Antoninus Pius; for a generation it was the north-western frontier of the Roman Empire. Running for 60 km from modern Old Kilpatrick on the north side of the River Clyde to Bo’ness on the Firth of Forth (across what is now the central belt of Scotland). In 2008 the Antonine Wall was inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Antonine Wall World Heritage Site will form part of the Frontiers of the Roman Empire World Heritage Site, which includes Hadrian’s Wall in England and the German Limes. Although most of the wall has been destroyed over time, sections of the wall can still be seen in Cumbernauld and Kilsyth.

Note: many sites marked as part of the Antonine Wall tend to be limited to stone remains (which are usually at ground level). Certain spots along the remains of Antonine Wall, like Croy Hill, have more to see. Still, such sites don’t compare to the medieval castles that are still found throughout Scotland (and tend to remain in their original state).